Platanos, Paseos y Bochinche

Hola Amigos! I’m currently writing my second blog from Santa Rita, despite the first post not uploading I promise I did not fall off the maintaining-a-blog-while-abroad wagon just yet. I tried to upload a previous post but even though the network on my phone is super strong, the hotspot barely loads webpages. And the icing on the cake, when I tried to upload the post while we were at the PC office on Monday, I realized my laptop was completely dead. So I guess the hashtag #firstworldproblems still applies?

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Anyways, this week has been really good. On Monday we went into the office for the first part of the day and then we spent the afternoon at an english school located in Panama City. The students prepared presentations for each of the different provinces in Panama, including outfits, traditional dances, and typical dishes. After rotating through every room, we were placed into groups and had to create a small play, along with a design and slogan for our teams. The scenario my group had to act out was about a group of tourists that took the wrong bus from Panama City. It was really fun collaborating with the students and helping them practice their english while PC trainees got to practice Spanish, and even though we didn’t win I was really proud of our final product!
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The rest of the week we had language lessons in the morning and tech training in the afternoon. For our language class, we got our project assignment this week, which is what we will focus most of our attention on for the rest of training. I’m going to be collecting research on Panamanian legends and stories with two other girls in my class. We’ll be interviewing our host families in Santa Rita, as well as the communities we visit next week. We’ll even visit some museums in La Chorrera and Panama City before our presentation in 8 weeks.
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IMG_7650.jpgFriday was really fun because we got to visit the primary school in our community. Another trainee and I got to observe a seventh grade class in their english, natural science, Spanish and physical education classes. In the Panamanian school system, students stay in one class at day, while the teachers rotate from class to class. The students were all very friendly and two young boys even offered us their seats because there weren’t enough in the classroom. IMG_7684.jpgIMG_7683.jpg
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Saturday we had another group activity, but this time it was in Panama City. The point of the trip was for everyone to get familiar with transportation in the city, as well as gaining familiarity with places that most volunteers will visit during their two years of service. Once we finished the assignment, we headed over to Casco Viejo and then to the fish market for lunch. We took a taxi back to the Albrook bus terminal and had dinner there before heading back to Santa Rita. Once I finished eating, I stopped by Sportline and got a yoga mat for $16. Score!
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That’s all for now, hasta luego 🙂
P.S. Shoutout to The 1975’s new album for keeping me alive when I feel like I might pass out from the heat. Kidding, it’s never thaaaat hot
P.P.S. The title of this post are some of the most common words I’ve heard since getting to Panama. Platanos are really common for any meal of the day. As volunteers, we are encouraged to pasear throughout community to get to know the residents of this town, which means greeting people and at least introducing yourself. And finally bochinche – this is the Panamanian word for gossip.
Update: We went to the river Sunday afternoon so I’m adding a couple pictures of that too. Disfruten 🙂 IMG_7765.jpgIMG_7773.jpgIMG_7771.jpg
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